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20120331
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indiana. a senator: i rise today in support of jobs and national security. first i want to take a moment to express my condolences to families who have lost loved ones in the tornadoes that struck indiana and other states on march 2. mr. lugar: last weekend senator coats and i toured the damaged areas of southern indiana and met with people who are dedicated to a full recovery from total devastation. i want to pay special tribute to advanced preparedness by the schools and many others that prevented even greater loss of life. also our gratitude goes out to the first responders who are doing amazing work in, some cases while facing their own devastating circumstances. i'm returning this weekend to encourage the continuing progress for recovery, and i'm working closely with governor daniels and other state officials to coordinate federal assistance that is appropriate given the level of devastation. madam president, i do rise in support of american jobs and national security in a very strong way and to encourage my colleagues to support the keystone x.l. pipeline amendment i've offered wit
the chair and i yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. mr. coats: mr. president, this past friday marked the two-year anniversary of the passage of the affordable care act, otherwise known as obama-care. that law was signed into -- or that bill was signs into law just two years ago this last -- signed into law just two years ago this last friday. waicht in the senate at the time -- i wasn't in the senate at the time. i was actually in the state of indiana campaigning to be in the senate as a representative of that state. and as such, i had a very considerable amount of time crisscrossing the state and talking to hoosiers about the health care plan and their response to what was going on in congress and to the passage of that law. from small diners and restaurants all across indiana to visits to small business, large business, medium-sized business, big industrial giants, small mom-and-pop operations, medical providers, ordinary citizens -- we in indiana joined the nearly two-thirds, or perhaps even more than the two-thirds of the rest of the country, that polled
are showing." she's referred to as the indiana jones of genealogy, so it's no wonder that c-span chose o select this -- chose to select this session for broadcast today. and, please, let's welcome megan smol enyak. [applause] >> thank you. >> how did this journey begin for you? >> i got into genealogy way back into the sixth grade. it was a homework assignment for meshe cede us go home -- made us go home and find where our surnames were from. and i remember actually feeling sorry or for my class mates because most of them were crowded around the british aisles, and i had -- isles, and i had the whole of the then-soviet union to myself. [laughter] that's when i realized, hey, there's something a little bit different about my heritage, and that's all it took to spark my curiosity. and i happened to live in the d.c. area, so i was the twisted 16-year-old. i wanted to turn 16 not to get a driver's license, but to be able to go to the national archives without an adult. i saved up my allowance to buy death certificates. [laughter] >> did this trouble your parents? >> yeah. but i was already t
minister, he graduated from anderson university in indiana, and indiana law school in indianapolis. he joined the fbi in 1983 in minneapolis. he worked in new york before moving to washington, dc to supervise it's organized crime section. since 1999, when he helped lead the inquiry into crash of egypt air flight 990, he has worked on some of the nation's highest profile cases involving national security. after the 9/11 attacks he was put in charge of the fbi's expanded counterterrorism branch, becoming the bureau's executive assistant director of counterterrorishing and counterintelligence. pistole led or was involved in a number of high profile investigations, including the 2003 suicide bombings in riyadh, saudi araina, the brakeup of a plot to bomb new york city subways in 2009, and the case of the would-be underware bomber on a detroit-bound jet on christmas day, and took part in the investigation of an attempted car bombing in times square in 2010. in 2004 he was named deputity directyear of the fbi and was serving serving in the number two position when president obama tapped him
not perform as well as i'd hoped. i'm hopeful it will perform better this year. >> host: indiana, rik democratic collar. >> caller: good morning. >> host: go ahead. >> caller: actually, i think the problem started in the 80's. before 1980 the private sector, about 25 to 30% or union. in the 80's those jobs headed south to nonunion states. that created a rumsfeld. now 15 years is so until it got into the 90's and we have nafta. those jobs went to mexico. union jobs pay more. you have to have people making enough money to pay income tax which have the people don't make enough now. and they are the consumer. they drive the economy. and right now the union part in the private sector is around 45% i think that's part of the problem. >> host: what to you think of a mark zendi? >> guest: well, interesting points. at think the caller is right that in the 80's the nation's manufacturing sector got hit very hard, particularly in the upper midwest, michigan, ohio, indiana. a lot of those jobs went to the south. a lot of those jobs went to mexico and the emerging world. not only because of nafta,
, which you all have been reading about in indiana and tennessee and illinois we always get tornadoes and severe storms with hail etc.. there are a group of scanners that will go from door to door from state to state following the storm. we call them storm shapers -- storm chasers. travelers come seasonally depended on what the issues are. they will follow a disaster and the door to door and say things like i just repaired your neighbors's approved and i have some material left over. be happy to give you a discount on your repair for your house because i have got one more day that i am going to be here. if you can decide right now. there is this high-pressure sale, concerned that your going to make a deal right now. we did it for your neighbor. they are trying to give a number of areas comfort with respect to i have already been in your neighborhood at southern. we have seen people get on the roof and make damage so that they can ostensibly repair it. a lot of times the insurance company gets involved where they talk the person into signing of their ability to take the money etc.. it
cowed a lot of the moderate republicans. someone like senator lugar from indiana, another person, especially in the area of foreign affairs with a long history of working in a bipartisan way. even orrin hatch from utah who is nobody's moderate just like robert bennett who is terrified of the tea party challenge. >> host: and the base primary. >> guest: yeah and soy think tom coburn, who is not a moderate, who is definitely a conservative, very fiscally conservative. he took some time off and became a senator from oklahoma. tom coburn was in the gang of six and i think, i have always found him a republican. you asked for a republican. i've always found him to be very honest, very straightforward and worked in the gang of six. i think he has a good relationship with barack obama. i think he respects him and i think he has always tried to be honest and work on the deficit and cares a lot about deficit reduction. he is not running for re-election. he has announced that he is not running for election. >> host: some of this has come from the sense that he is retired. >> guest: that's r
is an independent caller joining us from south bend, indiana. good morning. >> caller: good morning, libby and c-span. >> host: hi. >> caller: hi. well, i saw the president's speech and of course -- with aipac. i hope c-span will let me get my comments out. while there is, i think there is some room for concern of course with iran and their nuclear program i think it is unfortunate again that we have to police the world and -- to the zionists at aipac. the say per rattling, really doesn't do us any good but, of course the president has to go there to this aipac and do that. and just unfortunate that we're still policing the world like this, dictating who does what when and i don't think iran would be suicidal wanting to lob one weapon over into israel like that. everybody knows what the results would be. >> host: let's take a listen to more what the president had to say yesterday at aipac. >> iran's leaders should have no doubt about the resolve of the united states. [applause] just as they should not doubt israel's sovereign right to make its own decisions about what is required to meet its sec
in indiana appoint, and there's this question now, there's some inspector general activity centered on things close to the goff -- governor's office, and it's particularly some of the problems that people identified earlier about having the governor appoint somebody who then has to do investigation over the governor's office raise questions of partiality. that's a real issue. when you talk about -- we have a fairly complex nature between the inspector general, state board of accounts, and when you talk about false claims, i was going to suggest if you have a false claims, have a key element because as much as we like to think the investigations lead to this, nine times out of ten it's somebody inside coming to you explaning how, and so i think the fact of the inspector general doesn't have the resources, and in my office, they don't account for everybody else. there's some opportunity for people to come forward, and i think in the statute, and i think it's critical for all of the areas. >> and that's right, and then if you have a source of these cases, and you are prepared to do them, you can
it has got a lot of the moderate republicans, someone like senator lugar from indiana, another person especially in the area of foreign affairs with a long history of working in a bipartisan way. sp1 obama's old friend. >> guest: even orrin hatch from utah, nobody's moderate, just like robert bennett, terrified of the tea party challenge. >> host: about-face. >> guest: i think tom coburn who is not a moderate, definitely a conservative, very fiscally conservative who was in the class of '94 in the house and then became a senator from oklahoma. tom coburn was in the gang of six, and i think i have always found him a republican. i have always found him to be very honest, very straightforward. he worked in the gang of six. i think he has a good relationship with barack obama. i think he respects and. i think he has always tried to be honest and work on the deficit. he cares a lot about deficit reduction. he is not running for reelection next time though. he was announcing that he is not right for reelection. >> host: some of it comes from the sense that he was retiring. >> guest: that's
indiana, another person especially in the area of foreign affairs has a long history working in a bipartisan way. >> host: obama's old friend. >> guest: even orrin hatch from utah who is nobody's moderate terrified of the tea party challenge. estimate he's definitely a conservative, very fiscally conservative and class of '94 in the house and took some time off and became a senator from oklahoma shoes and the gang of six and i think i have always found him a republican but police found him to be very honest, very straightforward, he works in a gang of six he is a good relationship with barack obama and respect him and he's always tried to be honest and work on the deficit and he cares a lot about deficit reduction he's not running next time hokies announced he's not running for reelection post and he was retiring. >> guest: that's right. so he is free to see and do what he wants. let's get a handle little bit and talk about solutions to this problem because they're hard to come by it's a little brief but i don't really blame you because it's just hard to figure of what the he
and indiana contributed to the relief efforts as well. in the west liberty area, district manager becky young and store manager jim householder coordinated donations of approximately $2,600 and jim's store employees were out immediately after the storm handing out paper towels, trash bags and gloves to relief volunteers. other home depot stores in kentucky and indiana led by district manager tim chote and district human resource manager leanne bruce donated thousands of dollars' worth of products such as chain saws, gloves, respirators, tarps, water and trash bags to organizations such as the henryville fire department and the local united way chapters. and store employees volunteered to assist those organizations in the recovery. lowes stores in kentucky also pitched in, providing gloves, tarps, shovels, bleach and other supplies to communities all across the state. in addition to over $300,000 donated by the company to relief efforts after the storm, the lowes district manager for kentucky, steven west, dispatched lowes' heroes, store employees who volunteer their time and their constructio
to door fraud that's still happening. >> unfortunately it is still very common. at the indiana attorney general's office we have seen all of these scams among the consumers that we are representing. one of the scams that is very common in our area partly because every year we face a lot of storms which you all been reading about in southern indiana and tennessee and illinois. we always get tornadoes and very severe storms with hail, etc.. there are a group of scanners that will go from door to door and from state to state following the storms. we typically call them storm chasers. sometimes we have a different group of scanners recall travelers that just come seasonally depending upon the issues are. but in the case of the storm chasers, what will happen is they will follow a disaster and go door to door and say things like i just repaired your neighbor's roof and i have some materials left over. i'd be happy to give you a discount on your repair for your house because i've got one more day that i'm going to be here if you can decide right now so there's always this high-pressure sales,
indiana mr. stutzman. >> thank you mr. mcclintock and mr. shuler i always appreciate your efforts because i know you've are really trying to find a solution and i appreciate that. you know i hear this from people back home that the spending is the problem but some people say do you know what? i've pay more in taxes if i knew it was going to go to pay down the deficit. people don't trust washington. people don't trust the fact that taxes would increase on one bracket or another and it would actually go towards deficit reduction. and so that is why i think we have to focus. we may have to take one step at a time rather than trying to do comprehensive, one big package together because people don't trust washington right now. and until we start reducing the deficit, i think that it's very difficult to do this in a comprehensive way. i appreciate it, i really do because i think we need tax reform badly and i think it has to be a part of the process to get our economy growing and people starting to trust the fact that when decisions are made in washington is not going to pull the rug out from u
it will perform better this year. >> evansville, indiana. go ahead. >> caller: actually, i think the problem started in the '80s, before 1980, the private sector, about 20 2 to 30% were union inch the 80s, those job headed south in the nonunion states and created the rust belt. and then we had nafta. those jobs went to mexico. union job pays more. you got to have people making enough money to pay income tax and most people don't make enough with the deductions they can talk, and if you're a consumer, they drive the economy. and right now the union part in the private sector, is 4 to 5%, and i think that's part of the problem. >> host: what do you think? >> guest: well, interesting point. i think the caller is right that in the '8s, the manufacturing sector got hit very hard, particularly in the upper midwest, mark ohio, indiana. those jobs went the south in the '90s, those jobs went to mexico and the emerging world, not only because of nafta but because of the china came on the scene and other emerging economies that were very competitive. so i think that description is -- there's a lot of t
of consumer protection in the office of the indiana attorney general. with that, i give you michael bloom, our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> well, thanks, folks and good afternoon. this panel i suspect will be very interesting and informative and let's just get right to it. we are going to talk about fraud directed at the elderly. seems to be a natural question. why do we have a special panel on fraud on the elderly? there is research that concerns particular vulnerabilities, that older folks may have to make them more susceptible than others to certain kinds of frauds. i would like to start then with betsy about some of the research that the aarp may have done concerning those kind of vulnerabilities. if you could give us some of those, those factors that make older folks more vulnerable perhaps to the frauds you're talking about here today? >> it's on. okay. i want to first put it in perspective. there are not a great many of statistics how many elderly are victimized but we know elderly financial abuse is dramatically underreported. maybe 24 people are victimized for any one reported
. quorum call: mr. coats: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from indiana. mr. coats: mr. president, i ask that the call of the quorum be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: mr. president, right now there's an issue on the mind of every hoosier and i think most americans -- not every american -- appeared that issue is the high price of gas. over the past few months, gas prices have risen higher and higher each week. currently across the nation i believe the average is somewhere close to $4, maybe $3.91 or $3 $3.3. in ip init' indiana, it's even n many parts of our state, well over $4 per gallon. that obviously has a significant economic impact on our country. it causes budgets to get tight tighter, planned vacations to either be canceled or shortened, families, farmers, businesses across the state of indiana are having to rethink their budgets for the year and make tough financial decisions for themselves. and this is all at a time when unemployment continues to remain high, persons ar, americans areg to make ends meet. rising gas and energy cos
in south bend, indiana -- most americans are very comfortable talking about religion. they actually like talking about it. we listened in on a few of these interviews as the questions were being asked, and it's very clear that most of the people we spoke to because they themselves are religious, that's the way america is, they were very comfortable talking about these sorts of questions and found it to be a very natural thing. so i'll just sort of put that out there as, you know, sort of my counter as to why i do take these results seriously. i don't want to take everything with a grain of salt. i don't necessarily believe that everyone who says they're in church every week is actually in church every week, but at least they want us to think it. and that's worst knowing. another question here. >> as an academic, political theology or interplay between politics, i'm sure you could give us an opinion on religion not being as big in politics, but we've been seeing an increased involvement as a specific campaign issue or creating division within political parties and within, you know, our co
-- and thousands of small businesses that manufacture things in our state and in michigan and in indiana and all over the region, all understood that it would be economic devastation, it would have led, i think -- i think many -- most economists think and most auto people and i think most ohioans think it would have led to a depression. so that was december 2008. because of a whole bunch of reasons, this place decided not to do what president bush thought we should do and then later on, a few months later when president obama said we've got to step up and do the right thing, it passed, with some republican support, not as much as we hoped for, but it passed. and we can now look -- this was december 2008 and early 2009 when president obama took the oamg of office. we can look at what has happened to this country. fundamentally we see an auto industry which is so important to our manufacturing in our country, and manufacturing so important to building a middle class. we can see what that's meant to our country. and i'll give you one big example. from 1997 until 2010 every single year we had seen a
. >> yeah, unfortunately, it's still very common. we at the indiana attorney general's office have seen all of these scams within -- among the consumers that we are representing. one of the -- one of the scams that's very common in our area, partly because every year we face a lot of storms, which you've all been reading about in southern indiana and tennessee and illinois -- we always get tornadoes. we always get very severe storms with hail, et cetera. there are a group of scammers that will go from door to door and from state to state, following the storms. we typically call them storm chasers. sometimes we have a different group of scammers that we call travelers that just come seasonally depending on the situation. in case of the storm chasers, what will happen is they will follow a disaster and they will go door to door and say things like, i just repaired your neighbor's roof and i have some materials left over. i'll be happy to give you a discount on your repair for your house 'cause i've got, you know, one more day that i'm going to be here. if you decide right now. so there's the
, department of justice. and abby, the director of consumer protection in the office of the indiana attorney general. and with that i give you michael bloom, our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> thanks, and good afternoon. this panel, i suspect, will be very interesting and informative and let's get to it. we're going to talk about fraud directed at the elderly, and a natural question is, why do we have a special panel on fraud on the elderly? and there is research that concerns particular vulnerabilities that older folks have that make them more susceptible than others to certain kinds of frauds. and i'd like to start with betsy, about some of the research that the aarp may have done concerning those vulnerabilities and if you could give us those factors that make older folks more vulnerable perhaps to the frauds we have been talking abouted to. >> it's on. okay. i want to -- there are not a great many statistics about how many elderly are victimized but we know that elderly financial abuse is dramatically underreported. maybe 24 people are victimized for every one that is reported to an
with the unemployment rate for americans at 8.3% nationally, 9% in my home state of indiana. our national debt has grown to more than $15 trillion. this scenario brings great pressure on the country's financial obligations and places the economy at some risk. in this context, the dollars available for a global developments will necessarily be limited. the task before us today is to ask whether our government uses those dollars as efficiently as possible to achieve the most benefits for u.s. foreign policy and development goals. our foreign assistance should be targeted as sustainable development promoting self-sufficiency and produces demonstrable results. ideally, also supports strengthening of democratic democracies and promote the rule of law in those democracies. as the path allows nations to rely on the world stage, it's important we be of assistance. the administration identified global food security, global house, and global climate change as the highest priorities for our development assistance this year. historically, there's been broad support for the united states' participation in internatio
's first battalion 143nd infantry regiment troop command to camp attarbury, indiana. his unit deployed forward to afghanistan just this month. he had only been in afghanistan just a few weeks when his unit encountered a group of children on its way out of the black hills firing range in logman province. the children were scavenging in the road for brass shell casings which are recyclable for money in afghanistan. dennis, a father of three, hopped down from his vehicle to help move the children safely out of the path of the convoy of trucks and armored vehicles. as the heavy trucks rumbled past, it appears that a young afghan girl darted back into the road to grab one last grass shell casing. seeing one of his unit's mine-resistant, ambush-protected vehicles bearing down on the girl, dennis reacted swiftly and selflessly, lifting the girl to safety and placing himself in the path of the 16-ton m-rap. i'm sure this was a parent's instinct and that dennis had in mind his own children, nicholas, age 8, hope, age 6, and baby madison. dennis was evacuated to the jalalabad medical treatment f
who would appoint the governor in indiana of points, so there is this question, now there's some inspector general activity centered on things close to the governor's office. so it's particularly, let's say, some of the problems that people have identified earlier about having the governor appoint somebody who is thin, has to do an investigation over the governor's office raises questions of impartiality. so that's a real issue. we knew talked about, we have a fairly complex nature between inspector general, state board of accounts. we do have, when you talk about false claims, i was going to suggest that if you do have a false claims, always have a key element because as much as we like to thank the investigations will lead to this, nine times out of 10 it will be somebody inside coming to you and explaining how it was done. and i think the same way the inspector general is not going to have the resources -- [inaudible] some opportunity of people come forward. and i think the statute ends up being critical for all these areas. >> and that's right. and then, if you have a source
of the state, tire manufacturers in bryant, near the indiana and michigan borders. these are good companies. they're not looking for handouts, not looking for an unfair edge, want a level pleed playing field. this -- plail when china doesn't play by the rules they suffer. this helps to fix this. and president obama announced his administration would pursue a case against china's hoarding of rare earth materials. rare earth hording is one of the illegal practices that china employs to tilt the playing field in its favor. u.s. manufacturers rely on earth materials, air earth materials for the production of a number of products including wind turbines and electronics. china accounts for 97% of the world's supply of these materials. they impose quotas and deaf tariffs on their export putting american manufacturers at a severe disadvantage almost forcing countries to go to china to do the manufacturing because the materials -- because of subsidies the chinese give to themselves, their own companies and because of the tariffs they charge on -- that they can extract from these companies for export
in the past. >> host: ahmad in new albany, indiana. you're on with professor randall kennedy. go ahead. >> caller: yes. the first question i have for you sir, is the transitional race men you spoke of. i would like to say i'm somebody like that. i wanted to know if you thought the work of john ralls would help us move in the direction. i'm an arab american and a post-9/11 v.a., and my experience, since i've been back and while i was in, was that we kind of experienced some of the bad parts of the race man's kind of thing because the bad aspects of that is that we kind of rank which one -- which races are more important, which discriminations are worst, and in my situation african-american in the work place and outside the work place have casually used epithets towards middle easterner and terrorist, and i wanted to get your views on that, and i really appreciate your work and thank you very much. >> thank you very much for calling. >> host: can black people be racist? answer, yes. and. >> guest: be've seen that, frankly, seen that throughout american history. black people have particip
to me. but when you go to detroit and you go to ohio and to go to pennsylvania, indiana and illinois rakish of the automotive industry reside, whole communities have been negatively impacted, just by the downturn. it would have been significantly worse. as president bush said, a million jobs in $150 billion in tax revenue would have been foregone by the government if it been allowed to fail. then there's the infrastructure, the national infrastructure is great nation would've been severely damaged. so i don't care how we got there. the question is, did it work? well, chrysler is life. we are alive and. we are not just alive, we are prospering. we are around the globe come in this country. since bankruptcy we've hired almost 17,000 employees in the united states alone and we have invested almost $10 billion. i know against trillion dollar deficit it sounds like. it's not. and the ability to build new cars. so we are focused on, you can what is the evolution of the industry. we can't afford to focus on the near-term. what's going to be like in 2030? why we spend so much money on altern
the state of indiana, end up being shortchanged simply because we have been more prudent in terms of how we spend our money. we haven't poured in the earmarks which raise our historical average. as a consequence, we end up being a donor state. more money going out than is coming back in. the senate has recently passed legislation to end the practice of earmarking, and i think that's a very positive step forward. but here we now have a federal program that in a sense is calculated and based on past earmarking. so if we're really serious about eliminating earmarking, we're also going to need to fix the formulas used in current programs to end that practice in terms of rewarding states more money than they deserve. this amendment fixes this inequity and restores the trust fund to its original intent to give taxpayers money back to them in the amount that they deposited. under my amendment, each state will get back what it puts in out of the total available funds. it's a fairness issue and a means by which we can restore the confidence of the american people that a trust fund is truly a trust f
to solve disputes, you would do better. >> host: next as a call from a indiana. this is steve, democrat, you're on with david ignatius. good morning, steve. >> caller: number one, we should've never been in afghanistan. we should've never been in iraq. and we need to tell israel to leave iran alone, because they are the ones that are causing all the problems for us. >> guest: well, first, i guess i, i come to agree that the invasion of iraq was a mistake. at the time i thought it was justified, as a lot of people did. but seeing the costs and benefits, it's hard not to come back to that conclusion. on afghanistan, when you think back to september 11, 2001, and defeating i think most americans had no had to take this fight to the people who have done that terrible thing to our cities, it's hard to think that we wouldn't have gone into afghanistan. the question was, how hard, how long, what kind of forces? as i said earlier i think i've learned the more use of paramilitary forces and smaller footprint makes sense. in terms of finally of israel and iran, as i said before, it's clear that p
commander of the u.s. navy reserves 21 years in the military tom pick grow from crawfordsville indiana. i met him for the first time just a few weeks ago. this is not a gotcha kind of letter but i want you to respond to it. appreciate if mike democrat as well as republican colleagues would appreciate what it's saying. this is after he talked about the 12 servicemembers who work natively electrocuted because of faulty wiring and battle attrition by defense contractors. station in the green zone i was assigned a living trailer that is joined a trailer too young contractors and it points. chipping there for while i struck up a conversation and found out they had a job running a network cable. when asked how they'd like to face it was so great to be working there and he was making over $3000 per year plus all expenses and he bragged if he could stay there for three years he would able to put $1 million in the bank and retire before he turned 30. another example, one of the officers befriended a contractor in one day she came to him in tears. he was an honest girl and couldn't understand why h
. the secretary from nevada, ross miller. the secretary of state from indiana, charles wright. and the secretary of state from illinois, jess white -- jesse white says the same thing. beware of the house bill, it is flawed. it has some good ideas in it, but those flaws need to be corrected. that's what the reed-landrieu-levin et al does. we aren't trying to kill these wonderful ideas, exciting ideas. we're trying to fix it so it's better. and i hope that our members on the other side will join us in doing that and i'd like to submit this to the record. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: the last -- i'm sorry, there are two more. actually i'm sorry, four more, we've gotten so many. the next one is from my office of financial institutions from baton rouge, my commissioner, banking commissioner wrote me. he is generally in favor of some of the things in the house bill, but he said i'm writing to urge you to oppose the preemption of louisiana law to protect investors. that, i'd like to put into the record. the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: the american sust
, but beneficially. this is where the term "beneficial owner" comes from. in such indiana stawnses -- in such instances, the shares are held by someone else. if you buy shares through charles schwab, that discount broker firm would likely serve as the record owner and you'll be the beneficial or in. it is dwriewr your money, you -- it is your mornings you paid for it. it is your vote. it is your right to sell the shares. but as far as the company is concerned, the record owner is the broker. now, i think we've all been familiar and we've all received in the mail a big package of proxy materials from your broker. it is not in many cases directly from the company. it is from the wells fargo advisors. frit is from schwab advisors. because they are the ones who are the record owners, they distribute the material to beneficial owners. the consequences that for companies that may have very few or relatively few record holders, they have thousands and thousands of beneficial owners. those are the individuals that will lose out if the company decides under the house rule to suddenly go dar
. president? the presiding officer: i'm sorry. the senator from indiana. a senator: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coats: mr. president, i'd like to speak as if in morning business on a matter that affects a lot of he shaours. i -- hoosiers. i do that with condolences to all who suffered from the tragic storms, tornadoes that swept across the southern part of our state friday afternoon. gratitude for all those who responded in such a wonderful way to address this situation, and deep pride for the people of indiana in terms of how they responded to this. mother nature's unforgiving force friday afternoon changed the lives of being hoosiers. imagine, if you could, a stretch of land extending for nearly 50 miles, between a quarter of a mile and a half-mile wide, and a storm that touches down at the beginning of that 50-mile stretch and moves through that with force and destruction that is almost unimaginable. most of us from the midwest are used to hurricanes -- excuse me -- to tornadoes, and they usuall
indiana law back in, as i said, in 2008. it's nearly identical to the one in texas, and it is justified by a valid interest in protecting the integrity and reliability of the electoral process. but the justice department continues to insist that there's something wrong with requiring every voter to prove their identity before they vote, just like you're required to do before you board an airplane, before you buy a pack of cigarettes at a convenience store, before you buy a six-pack of beer at that same convenience store. or if you look on the web site of the department of justice, in order to gain entry to the department of justice billing, you need -- you guessed it. a photo i.d. so this may sound like common sense. common sense is evidently not that common at the department of justice these days. you would have to be blinded to reality to deny that a significant amount of voter fraud exists in the united states. every state has had its experience with voter fraud. in texas, back in the famous box 13 election between coch stevenson and lyndon johnson for the united states senate, they
to amendment number 1782 offered by the senator from indiana, mr. coats. mr. coats: mr. president, i ask for regular order here. the presiding officer: yes. order, please. if the senators wish to converse, they can take it outside. mr. coats: mr. president, this amendment is simple. the presiding officer: excuse me, i'm sawyer. there is a correction. the number of the amendment is 1517. my apologies. mr. coats: mr. president, this amendment is very simple. it's a matter of equity and fairness. the reality is a majority of states, like indiana, my state, and many, many others do not receive their fair share of the distribution of highway funds. this bill unfairly rewards a minority of states that have collected earmarks in the past that go to establishing this historical bench 345rbg -- benchmark from which the distributions are made. this amendment creates a new system by which everyone is treated equally and treated fairly. a system of winners and losers is not the way we ought to be forward with distributing funds that are paid by our taxpayers for building of roads and bridges. so let
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